jitsi

All posts tagged jitsi

If you plan to have multiple participants in your WebRTC calls then you will probably end up using a Selective Forwarding Unit (SFU).  Capacity planning for SFU’s can be difficult – there are estimates to be made for where they should be placed, how much bandwidth they will consume, and what kind of servers you need.

To help network architects and WebRTC engineers make some of these decisions, webrtcHacks contributor Dr. Alex Gouaillard and his team at CoSMo Software put together a load test suite to measure load vs. video quality. They published their results for all of the major open source WebRTC SFU’s. This suite based is the Karoshi Interoperability Testing Engine (KITE) Google funded and uses on webrtc.org to show interoperability status. The CoSMo team also developed a machine learning based video quality assessment framework optimized for real time communications scenarios. ...

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If you’re new to WebRTC, Jitsi was the first open source Selective Forwarding Unit (SFU) and continues to be one of the most popular WebRTC platforms. They were in the news last week because their parent group inside Atlassian was sold off to Slack but the team clarified this does not have any impact on the Jitsi team. Helping to show they are still chugging along, they released a new feature they wanted to talk about – off-stage layer suspension. This is a technique for minimizing bandwidth and CPU consumption when using simulcast. Simulcast is a common technique used in multi-party video scenarios. See Oscar Divorra’s post on this topic and that Fippo post just last week for more on that. Even if you are not implementing a  simulcast, this is a good post for understanding how to control bandwidth and to see some follow-along reverse-engineering on how Google does things in its Hangouts upgrade called Meet. ...

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Atlassian’s HipChat acquired BlueJimp, the company behind the Jitsi open source project. Other than for positive motivation, why should WebRTC developers care? Well, Jitsi had its Jitsi Video Bridge (JVB) which was one of the few open source Selective Forwarding Units (SFU) projects out there. Jitsi’s founder and past webrtcHacks guest author, Emil Ivov, was a major advocate for this architecture in both the standards bodies and in the public. As we have covered in the past, SFU’s are an effective way to add multiparty video to WebRTC. Beyond this one component, Jitsi was also a popular open source project for its VoIP client, XMPP components, and much more. ...

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