simulcast

All posts tagged simulcast

If you’re new to WebRTC, Jitsi was the first open source Selective Forwarding Unit (SFU) and continues to be one of the most popular WebRTC platforms. They were in the news last week because their parent group inside Atlassian was sold off to Slack but the team clarified this does not have any impact on the Jitsi team. Helping to show they are still chugging along, they released a new feature they wanted to talk about – off-stage layer suspension. This is a technique for minimizing bandwidth and CPU consumption when using simulcast. Simulcast is a common technique used in multi-party video scenarios. See Oscar Divorra’s post on this topic and that Fippo post just last week for more on that. Even if you are not implementing a  simulcast, this is a good post for understanding how to control bandwidth and to see some follow-along reverse-engineering on how Google does things in its Hangouts upgrade called Meet. ...

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You don’t need to fit an SFU opponent when testing simulcast. Image: Hall of Mirrors scene from Bruce Lee’s Enter the Dragon

Simulcast is one of the more interesting aspects of WebRTC for multiparty conferencing. In a nutshell, it means sending three different resolution (spatial scalability) and different frame rates (temporal scalability) at the same time. Oscar Divorra’s post contains the full details.

Usually, one needs a SFU to take advantage of simulcast. But there is a hack to make the effect visible between two browsers — or inside a single page. This is very helpful for single-page tests or fiddling with simulcast features, particular the ability to enable only certain spatial layers or to control the target bitrate of a particular stream. ...

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Slack is an über popular and fast growing communications tool that has a ton of integrations with various WebRTC services. Slack acquired a WebRTC company a year ago and launched its own audio conferencing service earlier this year which we analyzed here and here. Earlier this week they launched video. Does this work the same? Are there any tricks we can learn from their implementation? Long time WebRTC expert and webrtcHacks guest author Gustavo Garica takes a deeper dive into Slack’s new video conferencing feature below to see what’s going on under the hood. ...

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Dealing with multi-party video infrastructure can be pretty daunting. The good news is the technology, products, and standards to enable economical multiparty video in WebRTC has matured quite a bit in the past few years. One of the key underlying technologies enabling some of this change is called simulcast. Simulcast has been an occasional sub-topic here at webrtcHacks in the past and it is time we gave it more dedicated attention.

To do that we asked Oscar Divorra Escoda, Tokbox’s Senior Media Scientist and Media Cloud Engineering Lead to walk us through it. Tokbox was one of the first to market with a SFU and Oscar shares some of his learnings below. ...

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Update: Philipp continues to reverse engineer Hangouts using chrome://webrtc-internals. Please see the bottom section for new analysis he just put together in the past couple of days based on Chrome 38.

As initiators and major drivers of WebRTC, Google was often given a hard time for not supporting WebRTC in its core collaboration product. This recently changed when WebRTC support for Hangouts was added with Chrome 36.

So obviously we wanted to check out how this worked. We also were curious to see how a non-googler could make some practical use of chrome://webrtc-internals. Soon thereafter I came across a message from Philipp Hancke (aka Hornsby Cornflower) saying he had already starting looking at the new WebRTC hangouts with webrtc-internals. Fortunately I was able to convince him to share his findings and thorough analysis. ...

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