Chrome

All posts tagged Chrome

Back in October 2013,  the relative early days of WebRTC, I set out to get a better understanding of the getUserMedia API and camera constraints in one of my first and most popular posts. I discovered that working with getUserMedia constraints was not all that straight forward. A year later I gave an update after the situation with Chrome was greatly improved, but Firefox at the time effectively only supported a single resolution so constraints were not much help. Specifically, I am interested in understanding what happens when you ask for a specific resolution. You might want to have a specific resolution returned by getUserMedia if you want to match the camera resolution to a specific video area to have a 1 to 1 pixel correlation, in a computer vision application where each pixel represents a distance, or if you are dealing with non-standard video devices.

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No thoroughfare

“Only Secure Origins Are Allowed”

    – Chrome 47

Chrome 47 now forces secure origins (mostly) with HTTPS. This can be a pain to deal with, but Xander Dumaine is here to help with some guidance. Xander is a Senior Software Engineer who deals with the good and bad of WebRTC for Interactive Intelligence in Raleigh, NC. He is helping maintain simpleWebRTC and organises the Triangle WebRTC Meetup group in that area.

{“editor”: “chad hart“}

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I Think I'm Being Watched

There has been more noise about WebRTC making it possible to track users. We have covered some of the nefarious uses of WebRTC and look out for it before. After reading a blog post on this topic covering some allegedly new unaddressed issues a week ago I decided to ignore it after some discussion on the mozilla IRC channel. But this has some up on a the twitter-sphere again and Tsahi said ‘ouch’, here are my thoughts.

Claims

The blog post (available here) makes a number of claims about how certain Chrome behavior makes fingerprinting easier:

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Let’s have some more fun with getUserMedia by creating a simple mirror application and determining its frame rate.

If your user is going to send their video, it is a general best practice to let them see what they are sending. To do this you simply route the local video stream capture by getUserMedia to a <video> element inside the DOM. That is pretty easy, but the challenge is the video you see is not mirrored. When you are looking at yourself you expect to see a mirrored image. When you don’t it feels off and leads to a poor user experience. Ok, so everyone mirrors their local video, so let’s do that.

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Ring! Sometimes you need an alert to get your attention. Traditional phone systems make this easy – if someone calls you your phone rings. The traditional telephony model assumes the called device is always on an available to ring and this is how it generally works across analog phones, mobiles, VoIP phones, and even desktop calling replacements like Skype. The challenge in the web model is that you can no longer assume the remote device is available to run your program’s ring command. Even if the called party has a browser open, it does not mean they have a tab running your app.  This means you need to find some other means of telling the called party to go to your URL. That can be limiting for a lot of apps. Fortunately there are solutions for this.

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