Popular this Month

There is a cool new feature everyone has been trying to implement – background transparency. Virtual backgrounds have been around for a while. Rather than inserting a new background behind user(s), transparency removes the background altogether, allowing the app to place users over a screen share or together in a shared environment. There doesn’t seem to be a universal name for this feature. Zoom calls it Immersive View. Microsoft calls it Together Mode. RingCentral calls them overlays. Virtual green screens or newscaster mode are other names. ...  Continue reading

One of WebRTC’s great features is its mandated strong encryption.  Encryption mechanisms are built-in, meaning developers don’t (often) need to deal with the details. However, these easy, built-in encryption mechanisms assume you have: 1) media is communicated peer-to-peer and 2) a secure signaling channel setup. Most group-calling services make use of a media server device, like a Selective Forwarding Unit (SFU) that terminate and re-encrypt, preventing the end-to-end encryption (e2ee). As we have covered here before, WebRTC e2ee is still possible with new APIs like Insertable Streams. That addresses the first assumption, but what about the second? How does one set up secure signaling for e2ee? ...  Continue reading

Introduction to capture handle - a new Chrome Origin Trial that lets a WebRTC screen sharing application communicate with the tab it is capturing. Examples use case discussed include detecting self-capture, improving the use of collaboration apps that are screen shared, and optimizing stream parameters of the captured content.

Pion seemingly came out of nowhere to become one of the biggest and most active WebRTC communities. Pion is a Go-based set of WebRTC projects. Golang is an interesting language, but it is not among the most popular programming languages out there, so what is so special about Pion? Why are there so many developers involved in this project? 

To learn more about this project and how it came to be among the most active WebRTC organizations, I interviewed its founder – Sean Dubois. We discuss Sean’s background and how be got started in RTC, so see the interview for his background.  I really wanted to understand why he decided to build a new WebRTC project and why he continues to spend so much of his free time on it. ...  Continue reading

Interview with WebRTC standards co-chair and author, Bernard Aboba. We cover the current status of WebRTC and where it is headed including WebRTC-NV, Simulcast, SVC, AV1, WebTransport, WebCodecs, ML and more.