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There are a lot of notable exceptions, but most WebRTC developers start with the web because well, Web RTC does start with web and development is much easier there. Market realities tells a very different story – there is more traffic on mobile than desktop and this trend is not going to change. So the next phase in most WebRTC deployments is inevitably figuring out how to support mobile. Unfortunately for WebRTC that has often meant finding the relatively rare native iOS and Android developer.

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Android got a lot of WebRTC’s mobile development attention in the early days.  As a result a lot of the blogosphere’s attention has turned to the harder iOS problem and Android is often overlooked for those that want to get started with WebRTC. Dag-Inge Aas of appear.in has not forgotten about the Android WebRTC developer. He recently published an awesome walkthrough post explaining how to get started with WebRTC on Android. (Dag’s colleague Thomas Bruun also put out an equally awesome getting started walkthrough for iOS.) Earlier this month Google also announced some updates on how WebRTC permissions interaction will work on the new Android.  Dag-Inge provides another great walkthrough below, this time covering the new permission model.

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WebRTC is supposed to be secure. A lot more than previous VoIP standards. It isn’t because it uses any special new mechanism, but rather because it takes it seriously and mandates it for all sessions.

Alan Johnston decided to take WebRTC for a MitM spin – checking how easy is it to devise a man-in-the-middle attack on a naive implementation. This should be a reminder to all of us that while WebRTC may take care of security, we should secure our signaling path and the application as well.

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This is the next decode and analysis in Philipp Hancke’s Blackbox Exploration series conducted by &yet in collaboration with Google. Please see our previous posts covering WhatsApp and Facebook Messenger for more details on these services and this series. {“editor”: “chad“}

FaceTime is Apple’s answer to video chat, coming preinstalled on all modern iPhones and iPads. It allows audio and video calls over WiFi and, since 2011, 3G too. Since Apple does not talk much about WebRTC (or anything else), maybe we can find out if they are using WebRTC behind the scenes?

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The world of browsers and how they work is both complex and fascinating. For those that are new to the browser engine landscape, Google, Apple, and many others collaborated on an open source web rendering engine for many years known as WebKit.  WebKit has active community with many less well known browsers that use it, so the WebKit community was shocked when Google announced they would fork WebKit into a new engine for Chrome called Blink.

Emphasis for implementing WebRTC shifted with Google into Blink at the expense of WebKit. To date, Apple has not given any indications it was going to add  WebRTC into WebKit (see this post for an idea on nudging them). This is not good for the eclectic WebKit development community that would like to start working with WebRTC or those hoping for WebRTC support in Apple’s browsers.

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Two weeks ago Philipp Hancke,  lead WebRTC developer of Talky and part of the &yet‘s WebRTC consulting team, started a series of posts about detailed examinations he is doing on several major VoIP deployments to see if and how they may be using WebRTC. Please see that post on WhatsApp for some background on the series and below for another great analysis – this time on Facebook Messenger. {“editor”: “chad“}

Last week, Facebook announced support for video chats in their Messenger app. Given that Messenger claims to account for 10% of global mobile VoIP traffic, this made in a very interesting target for further investigation. As part of the series of deconstructions, the full analysis (another fifteen pages, using the full range of analysis techniques demonstrated earlier) is available for download here, including the wireshark dumps.

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One of our first posts was a Wireshark analysis of Amazon’s Mayday service to see if it was actually using WebRTC. In the very early days of WebRTC, verifying a major deployment like this was an important milestone for the WebRTC community. More recently, Philipp Hancke – aka Fippo – did several great posts analyzing Google Hangouts and Mozilla’s Hello service in Firefox. These analyses validate that WebRTC can be successfully deployed by major companies at scale. They also provide valuable insight for developers and architects on how to build a WebRTC service.

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WebRTC-based services are seeing new and larger deployments every week. One of the challenges I’m personally facing is troubleshooting as many different problems might occur (network, device, components…) and it’s not always easy to get useful diagnostic data from users.

troubleshooting (Image source: google)

troubleshooting (Image source: google)

Earlier this week, Tsahi, Chad and I participated at the WebRTC Global Summit in London and had the chance to catch up with some friends from Google, who publicly announced the launch of test.webrtc.org. This is great diagnostic tool but, to me, the best thing is that it can be easily integrated into your own applications; in fact, we are already integrating this in some of our WebRTC apps.

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Apple Feast

Apple Feast photo courtesy of flikr user Overduebook. Licensed under Creative Commons NC2.0.

One of the biggest complaints about WebRTC is the lack of support for it inside Safari and iOS’s webview. Sure you can use a SDK or build your own native iOS app, but that is a lot of work compared to Android which has Chrome and WebRTC inside the native webview on Android 5 (Lollipop) today. Apple being Apple provides no external indications on what it plans to do with WebRTC. It is unlikely they will completely ignore a W3C standard, but who knows if iOS support is coming tomorrow or in 2 years.

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Unnatural shrinkage. Photo courtesy Flikr user Ed Schipul

Unnatural shrinkage. Photo courtesy Flikr user Ed Schipul

One evening last week, I was nerd-sniped by a question Max Ogden asked:

maxodgen-tweet

That is quite an interesting question. I somewhat dislike using Session Description Protocol (SDP)  in the signaling protocol anyway and prefer nice JSON objects for the API and ugly XML blobs on the wire to the ugly SDP blobs used by the WebRTC API.

The question is really about the minimum amount of information that needs to be exchanged for a WebRTC connection to succeed.

 WebRTC uses ICE and DTLS to establish a secure connection between peers. This mandates two constraints:

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