redundancy

All posts tagged redundancy

Chrome recently added the option of adding redundancy to audio streams using the RED format as defined in RFC 2198, and Fippo wrote about the process and implementation in a previous article. You should catch-up on that post, but to summarize quickly RED works by adding redundant payloads with different timestamps in the same packet. If you lose a packet in a lossy network then chances are another successfully received packet will have the missing data resulting in better audio quality.

That was in a simplified one-to-one scenario, but audio quality issues often have the most impact on larger multi-party calls. As a follow-up to Fippo’s post, Jitsi Architect and Improving Scale and Media Quality with Cascading SFUs author Boris Grozev walks us through his design and tests for adding audio redundancy to a more complex environment with many peers routing media through a Selective Forwarding Unit (SFU). ...  Continue reading

Back in April 2020 a Citizenlab reported on Zoom’s rather weak encryption and stated that Zoom uses the SILK codec for audio. Sadly, the article did not contain the raw data to validate that and let me look at it further. Thankfully Natalie Silvanovich from Googles Project Zero helped me out using the Frida tracing tool and provided a short dump of some raw SILK frames. Analysis of this inspired me to take a look at how WebRTC handles audio. In terms of perception, audio quality is much more critical for the perceived quality of a call as we tend to notice even small glitches. Mere ten seconds of this audio analysis were enough to set me off on quite an adventure investigating possible improvements to the audio quality provided by WebRTC. ...  Continue reading