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All posts by Chad Hart

It turns out people like their smartphone apps, so that native mobile is pretty important. For WebRTC that usually leads to venturing outside of JavaScript into the world of C++/Swift for iOS and Java for Android. You can try hybrid applications (see our post on this), but many modern web apps applications often use JavaScript frameworks like AngularJS, Backbone.js, Ember.js, or others and those don’t always mesh well with these hybrid app environments.

Can you have it all? Facebook is trying with React which includes the ReactJS framework and  React Native for iOS and now Android too. There has been a lot of positive fanfare with this new framework, but will it help WebRTC developers? To find out I asked VoxImplant’s Alexey Aylarov to give us a walkthrough of using React Native for a native iOS app with WebRTC. ...  Continue reading

The “IP Address Leakage” topic has turned into a public relations issue for WebRTC. It is a fact that the WebRTC API’s can be used to share one’s private IP address(es) without any user consent today. Nefarious websites could potentially use this information to fingerprint individuals who do not want to be tracked. Why is this an issue? Can this be stopped? Can I tell when someone is trying to use WebRTC without my knowledge? We try to cover those questions below along with a walkthrough of a Chrome extension that you can install or modify for yourself that provides a notification if WebRTC is being used without your knowledge. ...  Continue reading

Atlassian’s HipChat acquired BlueJimp, the company behind the Jitsi open source project. Other than for positive motivation, why should WebRTC developers care? Well, Jitsi had its Jitsi Video Bridge (JVB) which was one of the few open source Selective Forwarding Units (SFU) projects out there. Jitsi’s founder and past webrtcHacks guest author, Emil Ivov, was a major advocate for this architecture in both the standards bodies and in the public. As we have covered in the past, SFU’s are an effective way to add multiparty video to WebRTC. Beyond this one component, Jitsi was also a popular open source project for its VoIP client, XMPP components, and much more. ...  Continue reading

There are a lot of notable exceptions, but most WebRTC developers start with the web because well, Web RTC does start with web and development is much easier there. Market realities tells a very different story – there is more traffic on mobile than desktop and this trend is not going to change. So the next phase in most WebRTC deployments is inevitably figuring out how to support mobile. Unfortunately for WebRTC that has often meant finding the relatively rare native iOS and Android developer. ...  Continue reading

Android got a lot of WebRTC’s mobile development attention in the early days.  As a result a lot of the blogosphere’s attention has turned to the harder iOS problem and Android is often overlooked for those that want to get started with WebRTC. Dag-Inge Aas of appear.in has not forgotten about the Android WebRTC developer. He recently published an awesome walkthrough post explaining how to get started with WebRTC on Android. (Dag’s colleague Thomas Bruun also put out an equally awesome getting started walkthrough for iOS.) Earlier this month Google also announced some updates on how WebRTC permissions interaction will work on the new Android.  Dag-Inge provides another great walkthrough below, this time covering the new permission model. ...  Continue reading

The world of browsers and how they work is both complex and fascinating. For those that are new to the browser engine landscape, Google, Apple, and many others collaborated on an open source web rendering engine for many years known as WebKit.  WebKit has active community with many less well known browsers that use it, so the WebKit community was shocked when Google announced they would fork WebKit into a new engine for Chrome called Blink.

Emphasis for implementing WebRTC shifted with Google into Blink at the expense of WebKit. To date, Apple has not given any indications it was going to add  WebRTC into WebKit (see this post for an idea on nudging them). This is not good for the eclectic WebKit development community that would like to start working with WebRTC or those hoping for WebRTC support in Apple’s browsers. ...  Continue reading

One of the biggest complaints about WebRTC is the lack of support for it inside Safari and iOS’s webview. Sure you can use a SDK or build your own native iOS app, but that is a lot of work compared to Android which has Chrome and WebRTC inside the native webview on Android 5 (Lollipop) today. Apple being Apple provides no external indications on what it plans to do with WebRTC. It is unlikely they will completely ignore a W3C standard, but who knows if iOS support is coming tomorrow or in 2 years. ...  Continue reading

I was starting to work with a big dataset and was dreading the idea of bogging down my machine with MySQL or SQLServer, so I decided to give Google’s BigQuery a try. Before I got into my project, I was pleasantly surprised to a public GitHub dataset was readily available. Tsahi does a cursory analysis of WebRTC projects on GitHub by manually counting search results every month. I was also inspired by Billy Chia‘s great NoJitter post analyzing WebRTC topics on Stack Overflow.

I was curious to see if I could extract some details from GitHub to see: ...  Continue reading

There have been many major WebRTC launches in the past months including Facebook and KimDotCom. Before those, Mozilla started bundling a new WebRTC calling service right into Firefox. Of course we wanted to check out to see how it worked.

To help do this we called on the big guns – webrtcHacks guest columnist Philipp Hancke. Philipp is one of the smartest guys in WebRTC outside of Google. In addition to his paid work for &yet he is the leading non-googler to contribute to the webrtc demos and samples and is also a major contributor to the Jitsi Meet and strophe.jingle projects. Google even asks him to proof-read their WebRTC release notes...  Continue reading

Sorry. We really wanted to do a post-cap of the W3C WebRTC and IETF RTCweb meetings that took place at the end of October and November, but we did not get to it. Victor and Reid provided some commentary on the codec debate prior to the IETF discussion. The outcome of that discussion was widely publicized and we did not have a lot of value to add to this for the developer community.

Importantly, codecs were not the only thing discussed in this latest rounds of standards meetings. There were a couple items like the move to JavaScript promises, output device enumeration, and discussions of security implications that are very relevant to the average WebRTC developer that have gone under the general media radar. To get the whole on standards right from the horse’s mouth, I asked W3C WebRTC editor and founding author Dan Burnett for an update on the recent WebRTC standards meetings and for some details on some of the more significant issues like promises and screen sharing. ...  Continue reading