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While Windows may no longer be the default platform it was a decade ago it still has a huge and active community. More than 400 million devices support Windows 10 and there are many millions of .NET and Visual Studio users out there. In fact, I made my first WebRTC application in .NET using XSockets years ago.
In addition to the couple 3rd party WebRTC libraries for WebRTC, Edge & Skype support for WebRTC/ORTC, Microsoft’s has had a few other less known and non-public WebRTC projects in the works.  Last week they publicly launched WebRTC for Universal Windows Platform (UWP), providing WebRTC support for another huge chunk of the world’s developers.
I asked, James Cadd, Microsoft’s Program Manager in the Windows Developer Platform Group in charge of the project to share some details.
Q: Tell us about this new WebRTC project for Windows.
A: Over the past 5 years WebRTC has had a huge impact on the development of applications, which now reach over 1 Billion users.  At Microsoft we needed a WebRTC solution that enables developers to create applications for all of our Windows 10 platforms including Desktop, Mobile, Xbox, HoloLens/VR and IoT.  And we wanted to give developers bit for bit compatibility with the Google codebase, with the same APIs, languages and frameworks they’re already using.  To that end, we launched a project to port the WebRTC codebase to Universal Windows Platform and optimize it to run more efficiently on resource and power constrained devices.
Last week we made the WebRTC for UWP Library available as a

Two weeks ago Microsoft’s Bernard Aboba (and former webrtcHack’s interviewee) gave an update on Edge’s ORTC and WebRTC at the Microsoft Build conference. He covered some big topics including VP8 and WebRTC 1.0 support. You can see the update video at the link above or read the follow-up post for details. Then last week Microsoft announced plug-in free Skype on the Edge browser.

I had some questions; Fippo had some questions; so we asked Bernard if he could publicly respond here. It turned out Bernard and his teammate on the Edge Browser team, Shijun Sun, were building a running list of questions they wanted to address too. Here it is. ...  Continue reading

We have been waiting a long time for Microsoft to add WebRTC to its browser portfolio. That day finally came last month when Microsoft announced its new Windows 10 Edge browser had ORTC. This certainly does not immediately address the Internet Explorer population and ORTC is still new to many (which is why we cover it often). On the positive side, interoperability between Edge, Chrome, and Firefox on the audio side was proven within days by multiple parties. Much of ORTC is finding its way into the WebRTC 1.0 specification and browser implementations. ...  Continue reading

As WebRTC has matured to a state where it’s first implementations are ready for companies to launch real services around it, the readiness of various companies to adopt WebRTC has fanned out quite a bit. Some are already charging ahead as early adopters, while others are playing it conservative. Of those in the conservative camp, one of the common doubts that gives them pause is: “What about IE?”

When speaking to those interested in WebRTC, but concerned about Internet Explorer (IE), many times we’ve tried to assure them not to worry: our friends in Redmond won’t be too far behind. We often point to the undeniably significant contributions from Microsoft to WebRTC, especially considering that they bring to the table two titans of VoIP industry (Lync and Skype). We highlight some of their early IE WebRTC demos (using beta code) as signs of progress. We’ve rationalized the absence of  a Microsoft equivalent to what Chrome and Firefox are shipping, by noting the slower release cycle for IE. However, we’ve come to realize that to some, IE support is a really big deal. ...  Continue reading

Software as a Service, Infrastructure as a Service, Platform as a Service, Communications Platform as a Service, Video Conferencing as a Service, but what about Gaming as a Service? There have been a few attempts at Cloud Gaming, most notably Google’s recently launched Stadia. Stadia is no stranger to WebRTC, but can others leverage WebRTC in the same way?

Thanh Nguyen set out to see if this was possible with his open source project, CloudRetro. CloudRetro is based on the popular go-based WebRTC library, pion (thanks to Sean of Pion for helping review here). In this post, Thanh gives an architectural review of how he build the project along with some of the benefits and challanges he ran into along the way. ...  Continue reading

Series preface: We generally lean toward long posts here at webrtcHacks, but not all interesting topics warrant a lot of new text. Sometimes briefer is better. So to better address the many topics that fit into this category, we are starting a new Minimum Duration series. Here is our first post under this set covering Perfect Negotiation.

What is Perfect Negotiation and why do we need it?

Long ago the WebRTC specification designers settled on leaving the signaling communication mechanism between two WebRTC peers up to the application. This means your code needs to handle passing Session Description Protocol (SDP) back and forth and giving that to the peerConnection API. Today WebRTC implementations also almost universally use Trickle-ICE, a form of Interactive Connectivity Establishment (ICE), which passes potential network paths between those peers asynchronously so a connection can be established as soon as possible. The asynchronous but time sensitive nature of all this means it is possible for glare conditions to occur – situations where both sides are making updates at the same time causing their state machines to get out of sync. Differences in how developers implement their code and browsers variances make this worse. ...  Continue reading

WebRTC has a new browser – kind of. Yesterday Microsoft’s  “new” Edge browser based on Chromium – commonly referred to Edgium – went GA. This certainly will make life easier for WebRTC developers since the previous Edge had many differences from other implementations. The big question is how different is Edgium from Chrome for WebRTC usage?

The short answer is there is no real difference, but you can read below for background details on the tests I ran. If you’re new around WebRTC the rundown may give you some ideas for testing your own product. ...  Continue reading

WebRTC isn’t the only cool media API on the Web Platform. The Web Virtual Reality (WebVR) spec was introduced a few years ago to bring support for virtual reality devices in a web browser. It has since been migrated to the newer WebXR Device API Specification.

I was at ClueCon earlier this summer where Dan Jenkins gave a talk showing that it is relatively easy to add a WebRTC video conference streams into a virtual reality environment using WebVR using FreeSWITCH. FreeSWITCH is one of the more popular open source telephony platforms and has had WebRTC for a few years. WebRTC; WebVR; Open Source – obviously this was good webrtcHacks material. ...  Continue reading