Walkthrough

All posts tagged Walkthrough

It turns out people like their smartphone apps, so that native mobile is pretty important. For WebRTC that usually leads to venturing outside of JavaScript into the world of C++/Swift for iOS and Java for Android. You can try hybrid applications (see our post on this), but many modern web apps applications often use JavaScript frameworks like AngularJS, Backbone.js, Ember.js, or others and those don’t always mesh well with these hybrid app environments.

Can you have it all? Facebook is trying with React which includes the ReactJS framework and  React Native for iOS and now Android too. There has been a lot of positive fanfare with this new framework, but will it help WebRTC developers? To find out I asked VoxImplant’s Alexey Aylarov to give us a walkthrough of using React Native for a native iOS app with WebRTC. ...

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The fact that you can use WebRTC to implement a secure, reliable, and standards based peer-to-peer network is a huge deal that is often overlooked.  We have been notably light on the DataChannel here at webrtcHacks, so I asked Arin Sime if would be interested in providing one of his great walkthrough’s on this topic.  He put together a very practical example of a multi-player game.  You make recognize Arin from RealTime Weekly or from his company Agility Feat or his new webRTC.ventures brand. Check out this excellent step-by-step guide below and start lightening the load on your servers and reducing message latency with the DataChannel. ...

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The “IP Address Leakage” topic has turned into a public relations issue for WebRTC. It is a fact that the WebRTC API’s can be used to share one’s private IP address(es) without any user consent today. Nefarious websites could potentially use this information to fingerprint individuals who do not want to be tracked. Why is this an issue? Can this be stopped? Can I tell when someone is trying to use WebRTC without my knowledge? We try to cover those questions below along with a walkthrough of a Chrome extension that you can install or modify for yourself that provides a notification if WebRTC is being used without your knowledge. ...

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There are a lot of notable exceptions, but most WebRTC developers start with the web because well, Web RTC does start with web and development is much easier there. Market realities tells a very different story – there is more traffic on mobile than desktop and this trend is not going to change. So the next phase in most WebRTC deployments is inevitably figuring out how to support mobile. Unfortunately for WebRTC that has often meant finding the relatively rare native iOS and Android developer. ...

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Android got a lot of WebRTC’s mobile development attention in the early days.  As a result a lot of the blogosphere’s attention has turned to the harder iOS problem and Android is often overlooked for those that want to get started with WebRTC. Dag-Inge Aas of appear.in has not forgotten about the Android WebRTC developer. He recently published an awesome walkthrough post explaining how to get started with WebRTC on Android. (Dag’s colleague Thomas Bruun also put out an equally awesome getting started walkthrough for iOS.) Earlier this month Google also announced some updates on how WebRTC permissions interaction will work on the new Android.  Dag-Inge provides another great walkthrough below, this time covering the new permission model. ...

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troubleshooting (Image source: google)

troubleshooting (Image source: google)

WebRTC-based services are seeing new and larger deployments every week. One of the challenges I’m personally facing is troubleshooting as many different problems might occur (network, device, components…) and it’s not always easy to get useful diagnostic data from users.

Earlier this week, Tsahi, Chad and I participated at the WebRTC Global Summit in London and had the chance to catch up with some friends from Google, who publicly announced the launch of test.webrtc.org. This is great diagnostic tool but, to me, the best thing is that it can be easily integrated into your own applications; in fact, we are already integrating this in some of our WebRTC apps. ...

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Unnatural shrinkage. Photo courtesy Flikr user Ed Schipul

Unnatural shrinkage. Photo courtesy Flikr user Ed Schipul

One evening last week, I was nerd-sniped by a question Max Ogden asked:

That is quite an interesting question. I somewhat dislike using Session Description Protocol (SDP)  in the signaling protocol anyway and prefer nice JSON objects for the API and ugly XML blobs on the wire to the ugly SDP blobs used by the WebRTC API.

The question is really about the minimum amount of information that needs to be exchanged for a WebRTC connection to succeed.

 WebRTC uses ICE and DTLS to establish a secure connection between peers. This mandates two constraints: ...

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Maybe I have been working with WebRTC for too long, but I constantly see use cases for it in my daily life. One of the more recent use cases has to do with my dog, Levy. Levy is an Old English Bulldog. Many years ago, when he was a cute little puppy, we would let him up on the couch. Over the years he has turned into a massive, gassy, dandruffy, shedding beast so we gradually weaned him off this habit in favor of a oversized, ridiculously fluffy doggy bed. He had been hooked on this new amenity for a while, but in the past several weeks he has been sneakily returning to his old habit when we were not home. ...

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Update: Philipp continues to reverse engineer Hangouts using chrome://webrtc-internals. Please see the bottom section for new analysis he just put together in the past couple of days based on Chrome 38.

As initiators and major drivers of WebRTC, Google was often given a hard time for not supporting WebRTC in its core collaboration product. This recently changed when WebRTC support for Hangouts was added with Chrome 36.

So obviously we wanted to check out how this worked. We also were curious to see how a non-googler could make some practical use of chrome://webrtc-internals. Soon thereafter I came across a message from Philipp Hancke (aka Hornsby Cornflower) saying he had already starting looking at the new WebRTC hangouts with webrtc-internals. Fortunately I was able to convince him to share his findings and thorough analysis. ...

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Let’s have some more fun with getUserMedia by creating a simple mirror application and determining its frame rate.

If your user is going to send their video, it is a general best practice to let them see what they are sending. To do this you simply route the local video stream capture by getUserMedia to a <video> element inside the DOM. That is pretty easy, but the challenge is the video you see is not mirrored. When you are looking at yourself you expect to see a mirrored image. When you don’t it feels off and leads to a poor user experience. Ok, so everyone mirrors their local video, so let’s do that. ...

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