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Session Description Protocol (SDP) is a fundamental, but very unintuitive concept behind how WebRTC works today. Its no wonder that the Anatomy of a WebRTC SDP post and the interactive SDP guide by Quobis CTO, Antón Román has been so popular here on webrtcHacks. With all things WebRTC, things have changed and we were due for an update.

We also had some rendering issues on the interactive guide. After failing to figure out how to fix it, I decided to completely rewrite it. It is still has some issues, so please make your pull requests to fix and update it on our github repo here.

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Two weeks ago Microsoft’s Bernard Aboba (and former webrtcHack’s interviewee) gave an update on Edge’s ORTC and WebRTC at the Microsoft Build conference. He covered some big topics including VP8 and WebRTC 1.0 support. You can see the update video at the link above or read the follow-up post for details. Then last week Microsoft announced plug-in free Skype on the Edge browser.

I had some questions; Fippo had some questions; so we asked Bernard if he could publicly respond here. It turned out Bernard and his teammate on the Edge Browser team, Shijun Sun, were building a running list of questions they wanted to address too. Here it is.

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Losing customers because of issues with your network service is a bad thing. Sure you can gather data and try to prevent, but isn’t it better to prevent issues in the first place? What are the most common pitfalls to look out for? What’s a good benchmark? What WebRTC-specific user experience elements should you spend your limited resources focusing on? No service can be perfect, so what is a reasonable error rate? These are all tough questions to answers without decent industry data.

Fortunately Lasse Lumiaho and Varun Singh from callstats.io have agreed to share some stats from their WebRTC monitoring service to help you answer these questions.  Their service does not monitor every WebRTC service,  but their 100+ customer base does provide a statistically meaningful sample to help give you some practical metrics for planning and comparison.

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Earlier this month Fippo published a post analyzing Slack’s new WebRTC implementation. He did not have direct access or a team account to do a thorough deep dive – not to mention he is supposed to be taking some off this month. That left many with some open questions? Is there more to the TURN network? How does multi-party calling work? How exactly is Slack using the Janus gateway? Fortunately WebRTC has an awesomely active and capable community that quickly picked up the slack (pun intended).

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slack webrtc2

Dear Slack,

There has been quite some buzz this week about you and WebRTC.

WebRTC… kind of. Because actually you only do stuff in Chrome and your native apps:

I’ve been there. Launching stuff only for Chrome. That was is late 2012. In 2016, you need to have a very good excuse to launch something with WebRTC and not support Firefox like this:
 

Maybe you had your reasons. As usual, I tried to get a dump from chrome://webrtc-internals to see what is going on. Thanks to Dag-Inge Aas for providing one. The most interesting bit is the call to setRemoteDescription:

I would like to note that you reply to Chrome’s offer of UDP/TLS/RTP/SAVPF with a profile of RTP/SAVPF. While that is still tolerated by browsers, it is improper.
Your a=msid-semantic line looks very interesting. “WMS janus”. Sounds familiar, this is meetecho’s janus gateway (see Lorenzo’s post on gateways here). Which by the way works fine with Firefox from what I hear.

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Back in October 2013,  the relative early days of WebRTC, I set out to get a better understanding of the getUserMedia API and camera constraints in one of my first and most popular posts. I discovered that working with getUserMedia constraints was not all that straight forward. A year later I gave an update after the situation with Chrome was greatly improved, but Firefox at the time effectively only supported a single resolution so constraints were not much help. Specifically, I am interested in understanding what happens when you ask for a specific resolution. You might want to have a specific resolution returned by getUserMedia if you want to match the camera resolution to a specific video area to have a 1 to 1 pixel correlation, in a computer vision application where each pixel represents a distance, or if you are dealing with non-standard video devices.

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No thoroughfare

“Only Secure Origins Are Allowed”

    – Chrome 47

Chrome 47 now forces secure origins (mostly) with HTTPS. This can be a pain to deal with, but Xander Dumaine is here to help with some guidance. Xander is a Senior Software Engineer who deals with the good and bad of WebRTC for Interactive Intelligence in Raleigh, NC. He is helping maintain simpleWebRTC and organises the Triangle WebRTC Meetup group in that area.

{“editor”: “chad hart“}

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Speak No Evil

A few days back my old friend Chris Koehncke, better known as “Kranky” asked me how hard it would be to implement a wild idea he had to monitor what percentage of the time you spent talking instead of listening on a call when using WebRTC. When I said “one day” that made him wonder whether he could offshore it to save money. Well… good luck!

A week later Kranky showed me some code. Wait, he is writing code? It was not bad – it was using the WebAudio API so going in the right direction. It was enough to prod me to finish writing the app for him.

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I Think I'm Being Watched

There has been more noise about WebRTC making it possible to track users. We have covered some of the nefarious uses of WebRTC and look out for it before. After reading a blog post on this topic covering some allegedly new unaddressed issues a week ago I decided to ignore it after some discussion on the mozilla IRC channel. But this has some up on a the twitter-sphere again and Tsahi said ‘ouch’, here are my thoughts.

Claims

The blog post (available here) makes a number of claims about how certain Chrome behavior makes fingerprinting easier:

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If you are new to WebRTC then you have missed out on years of drama in the standards bodies over various issues like SDP and codecs. These standards dictate what vendors must implement so they ultimately dictate the industry roadmap.  To get a deep perspective and appreciation of the issues, we like to ask Dan Burnett, W3C editor to comment on where we are at with the standardization process. I caught up with Dan at this year’s IIT Real Time Communications Conference and had the more detailed Q&A with him shortly thereafter.

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