Technology

One of WebRTC’s benefits is that the source to it is all open source. Building WebRTC from source provides you the ultimate flexibility to do what you want with the code, but it is also crazy difficult for all but the small few VoIP stack developers who have been dedicated to doing this for years. What benefit does the open source code provide if you can’t figure out how to build from it?

As WebRTC matures into mobile, native desktop apps, and now into embedded devices as part of the Internet of Things, working with the lower-level source code is becoming increasingly common. ...

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This is the next decode and analysis in Philipp Hancke’s Blackbox Exploration series conducted by &yet in collaboration with Google. Please see our previous posts covering WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger and FaceTime for more details on these services and this series. {“editor”: “chad hart“}

Wire is an attempt to reimagine communications for the mobile age. It is a messaging app available for Android, iOS, Mac, and now web that supports audio calls, group messaging and picture sharing. One of it’s often quoted features is the elegant design. As usual, this report will focus on the low level VoIP aspects, and leave the design aspects up for the users to judge. ...

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Atlassian’s HipChat acquired BlueJimp, the company behind the Jitsi open source project. Other than for positive motivation, why should WebRTC developers care? Well, Jitsi had its Jitsi Video Bridge (JVB) which was one of the few open source Selective Forwarding Units (SFU) projects out there. Jitsi’s founder and past webrtcHacks guest author, Emil Ivov, was a major advocate for this architecture in both the standards bodies and in the public. As we have covered in the past, SFU’s are an effective way to add multiparty video to WebRTC. Beyond this one component, Jitsi was also a popular open source project for its VoIP client, XMPP components, and much more. ...

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WebRTC is supposed to be secure. A lot more than previous VoIP standards. It isn’t because it uses any special new mechanism, but rather because it takes it seriously and mandates it for all sessions.

Alan Johnston decided to take WebRTC for a MitM spin – checking how easy is it to devise a man-in-the-middle attack on a naive implementation. This should be a reminder to all of us that while WebRTC may take care of security, we should secure our signaling path and the application as well. ...

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The world of browsers and how they work is both complex and fascinating. For those that are new to the browser engine landscape, Google, Apple, and many others collaborated on an open source web rendering engine for many years known as WebKit.  WebKit has active community with many less well known browsers that use it, so the WebKit community was shocked when Google announced they would fork WebKit into a new engine for Chrome called Blink.

Emphasis for implementing WebRTC shifted with Google into Blink at the expense of WebKit. To date, Apple has not given any indications it was going to add  WebRTC into WebKit (see this post for an idea on nudging them). This is not good for the eclectic WebKit development community that would like to start working with WebRTC or those hoping for WebRTC support in Apple’s browsers. ...

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A couple of decades ago if you bought something of any reasonable complexity, odds are it came with a call center number you had to call in case something went wrong. Perhaps like the airline industry, economic pressures on contact centers shifted their modus operandi from customer delight to cost reduction. Unsurprisingly this has not done well for contact center public sentiment. Its no wonder the web came along to augment and replace much of this experience –  but no where near all it. Today, WebRTC offers a unique opportunity for contact centers to combine their two primary means of customer interaction – the web and phone calls – and entirely change the dynamic to the benefit of both sides. ...

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Last year we interviewed Oleg Moskalenko and presented the rfc5766-turn-server project, which is a free open source and extremely popular implementation of TURN and STURN server. A few months later we even discovered Amazon is using this project to power its Mayday service. Since then, a number of features beyond the original RFC 5766 have been defined at the IETF and a new open-source project was born: the coTURN project.

Today we are catching up  with Oleg again to see what’s new and to learn what coTURN is about. ...

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As discussed in previous posts, WebRTC standards do not specify a signaling protocol. In general this decision is positive by giving developers the freedom to select (or invent) the protocol that best suits the particular WebRTC application’s needs. This can also reduce the time to market since standards compliance-related tasks are minimized. WebRTC media and data protocols from the provider to the user are standardized, so the lack of a standardized signaling protocol does not hurt interoperability of subscribers within the same network service. The calling party just has to have a URL from the called party to download its web app and to establish a WebRTC session with them. They both connect to the same web server and will then utilize the same signaling scheme. This is a new paradigm that is often difficult to embrace for traditional telephony developers who are used using the SIP protocols for handling all signaling, including the User to Network Interface (UNI) and Network-to-Network Interface (NNI). ...

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We probably talk about existing telephony stuff too much here, but the reality is there are billions of phone about there that want to be connected to the web like nearly everything else. This is especially important for any business that wants to link its website with its internal phone system.

If you are a modern enterprise or contact center, odds are you connect your phone system to the PSTN using a SIP trunk. This approach is light years ahead of previous technologies, but what about allowing callers to come in from the web with WebRTC? Often this means buying your own gateway or connecting your website to a hosted API provider. Is there something like a WebRTC trunk? ...

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One of the most vexing challenges for WebRTC developers is “what do you do with IE and Safari?” Do you ignore them? Tell your users to use something else? Can you even tell them what to do? Maybe you fall back to flash? There are no easy answers and WebRTC is supposed to be easy, right?

Perhaps you just wait and hope that Microsoft and Apple implement WebRTC soon? This brings a lot of risk – what exactly are they going to implement?  For Microsoft it seems it will likely be ORTC, definitely not the current spec. When exactly are they going to implement it? What is Apple going to do? What will you miss out on in the mean time? ...

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